SOUTHERN AFRICAN ASSOCIATION OF JUNGIAN ANALYSTS (SAAJA)

C G Jung Centre, Cape Town

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Jung and Film

Jung and Film

A discussion forum for exploring the experiences of
grief and transition to wholeness
through the medium of film

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PRESENTERS:  John Gosling, Renee Ramsden, Grace Reid
 Venue: C G Jung Centre,
87 Main Road,
Rosebank,
Cape Town 7700
Time:
Friday evenings at 18h00 for 18h30

 

 

Download Flyer pdf download

 

Cinema is pre-eminently the medium that engages people in a virtual dialogue with their own and their culture’s unconscious, more deeply than is commonly taken for granted. The movie theatre shares symbolic features with both the church and the therapy room: all are sacred spaces where people can encounter the archetypal and ease personal suffering, in the case of cinema through laughter or tears, without inhibition or fear. (Cinema as therapy, John Izod and Jaonna Dovalis)

This year we have chosen to explore the themes of grief and transition to wholeness through our choice of films. The first three movies are on the topic of grief, while the second three are exploring the transition to wholeness. Grief is a fact of life, since life is transient and loss inevitable. Grief is also an emotion that, if properly engaged with and fully experienced, facilitates healing, letting go, and thus a transition to wholeness. For this to happen, a sacred space, and sharing your story with an empathic listener, is essential. As the above quote states, cinema is one of the ways in which strong emotions can be facilitated through participating in the story of another. We will see through these movies, the various ways in which complexes can prevent the healthy grieving process, causing neuroses to develop. We will also see how facing losses and working through them, can bring the necessary transition from a stagnant state to a new flow of life. Please join us in this interesting and stimulating journey through film.

These evenings are open to all who are interested. A panel discussion based on each film/documentary will be offered to participants by the above 3 analysts.

 

Dates and topics

“Ordinary People” was Robert Redford’s 1980 directorial debut. It earned him the Oscar for Best Director. The movie won three other Oscars, including Best Film and Best Supporting Actor for 20-year-old Timothy Hutton. Based on the novel by Judith Guest, it shows a family in turmoil following the death of the older son, Buck, in a boating accident. The mother (played by Mary Tyler Moore) steels herself against grief, taking the “business as usual” approach. The younger son, Conrad (played by Hutton), who was with Buck during the fatal accident, can’t “keep it together,” suffers from severe anxiety and PTSD, and is hospitalized after a suicide attempt. When Conrad enters psychotherapy after discharge, the father (Donald Sutherland) finds himself caught between his wife and his son. “Ordinary People” is a powerful and moving illustration of the pain of loss leading to transformation in a process of authentic grief, as well as the price to be paid for keeping grief at bay.

 


10 February:  Ordinary People

image2“Ordinary People” was Robert Redford’s 1980 directorial debut. It earned him the Oscar for Best Director. The movie won three other Oscars, including Best Film and Best Supporting Actor for 20-year-old Timothy Hutton. Based on the novel by Judith Guest, it shows a family in turmoil following the death of the older son, Buck, in a boating accident. The mother (played by Mary Tyler Moore) steels herself against grief, taking the “business as usual” approach. The younger son, Conrad (played by Hutton), who was with Buck during the fatal accident, can’t “keep it together,” suffers from severe anxiety and PTSD, and is hospitalized after a suicide attempt. When Conrad enters psychotherapy after discharge, the father (Donald Sutherland) finds himself caught between his wife and his son. “Ordinary People” is a powerful and moving illustration of the pain of loss leading to transformation in a process of authentic grief, as well as the price to be paid for keeping grief at bay.


31 March:  Talk To Her

image3“Talk to Her” (Spanish: Hable con ella) is a 2002 dark Spanish comedy-drama written and directed by Pedro Almodóvar, and starring Javier Cámara, Darío Grandinetti, Leonor Watling, Geraldine Chaplin, and Rosario Flores. Almodóvar won the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for this film and it is now generally regarded as one of the finest films of the 2000s. The story unfolds in flashbacks, giving details of two separate relationships that become intertwined with each other. The story, viewed from the perspective of the two male characters, Marco and Benigno, reveals how very differently they each deal with loss and grief. Both these men are attempting to connect more deeply with their unconscious feminine sides – by nursing and relating to the women they love who are both comatose. The more emotionally mature Marco allows himself to be more in touch with his often-painful emotions of loss and grief while Benigno’s frozen emotions finally begin to thaw because of his relationship with Marco. The film is a complex multi-layered exploration of loneliness; relationships between men and women; relationships between men; attempts to connect with the inner feminine in men; plus, adventures into sexuality and identity. Some of the underlying sub-themes include references to the possible entrapment of living the life of a “father’s daughter”, the living out of a Saviour complex, and the power of a negative mother complex.


26 May:  Cold Comfort Farm

image4“Cold Comfort Farm”, initially released in 1995, is based on the famous comic novel by Stella Gibbons, telling the story of a London society girl, Flora Poste, who is orphaned at the age of 19. She decides that she wants to write a book, and needs inspiration for this. She elects to stay with her strange-sounding relatives, the Starkadders from Cold Comfort Farm in the fictional village of Howling in Sussex. The whole family is dominated by the matriarch, aunt Ada Doom, who holds sway over them through referring to a mysterious trauma from her childhood. Flora is not drawn into this family complex, and through a cheerful and matter-of-fact manner proceeds to transform the whole family by setting them on a journey to live their life’s dreams. While it is a very humorous movie, it still offers a very clear picture of the controlling force of an unconscious complex, and its transformation.


4 August:  It’s A Wonderful Life

image5“It’s a Wonderful Life”, the 1946 fantasy/drama by Frank Capra, stars Jimmy Stewart, Donna Reed and Lionel Barrymore. It tells the story of everyman George Bailey (Stewart), who sacrifices his dreams of adventure and travel to stay in his home town of Bedford Falls and run the town bank while his brother attains hero status as a pilot in World War II. (Stewart himself was a pilot in the second World War.) George marries a local girl (Reed), and as his children arrive one after the other, he sees his dreams disappear. Then his nemesis, Mr. Potter (Barrymore), seems to seize the upper hand for good. Driven to despair, George wishes he’d never been born, and jumps from a bridge into an icy river. He is saved by his guardian angel, Clarence Oddbody, Angel 2nd Class. Clarence shows George what Bedford Falls would be like if he really hadn’t been born. What George sees there transforms his attitude toward his life. With warmth, humor, and not a trace of sentimentality, “It’s a Wonderful Life” shows us that an “ordinary” life contains rich potential for transformation and redemption.


6 October:  Material

image6“Material” is a 2012 South African film, directed by Craig Freimond and written by Craig Freimond, Ronnie Apteker, Robbie Thorpe, Rosalind Butler and Riaad Moosa. After playing at Film Africa 2012 it has been shown at numerous film festivals around the world (London, International Film Festival of India, Busan) and gained a reputation as one of the best original South African films. Set in the Muslim Indian enclave of Fordsburg, Johannesburg, Material revolves around the tempestuous relationship between Cassim Kaif and his aging father whose one dream is for his son to take over the family’s fabric shop, while Cassim wants to be a stand-up comedian, a notion that his traditionalist father strongly disproves of. Its portrayal of the lives of Muslims in South Africa was seen as an honest attempt to tackle some of the social issues facing the country's multiracial society. It is a sensitive portrayal of the way a cultural complex can tear a family apart, while courage, firm confrontation and humour can bring healing and reconciliation.


24 November:   As It Is in Heaven

image7“As It Is in Heaven” is a Swedish film which was released to cinemas in Sweden in 2004, directed by Kay Pollak and starring Michael Nyqvist and Frida Hallgren. It was a box office hit in Sweden and several other countries. It was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the Hollywood 77th Academy Awards. Daniel Daréus (Michael Nyqvist) is a successful and renowned international conductor whose life aspiration is to create music that will open people's hearts. His own heart, however, is in bad shape. After suffering a heart attack on stage at the end of a performance, he retires indefinitely to Norrland in the far north of Sweden, to the village where he endured bullying as a child. He is invited to coach the local choir, in the process rediscovering his own joy in music. He falls in love with an attractive young woman in the choir, Lena, but because of his own unprocessed inner trauma has difficulty realizing this connection. The heart of each member of the choir starts to open, inspired by the music, thus realising Daniel’s life-long dream of being able “to create music that will open people’s hearts”. It is revealed that many of the folk in this town have very dysfunctional relationships and gradually some transformations and resolutions take place. The choir is accepted into the annual "Let the Peoples Sing" competition that leads to the climatic end of the film. This is a film about the transformational potential both of music, and the willingness to confront one’s past demons (that can help heal the psychic trauma and wounding); it is also about passion, relatedness, and the deeply moving power of love to bring about transformation.


 

About the presenters

RENEE RAMSDEN:    is a clinical psychologist and a Jungian analyst working in private practice in Wynberg, Cape Town, for 29 years. She is a founder member of the Southern African Association for Jungian Analysts (SAAJA) and a training analyst. She specializes in dream-analysis and has been studying alchemy and psychology as presented by C.G. Jung for 25 years. She has a longstanding interest in ancient goddess cultures and their relevance for the feminine in our current world.

JOHN GOSLING:    is a psychiatrist and Jungian analyst. He trained at the C.G. Jung Institute of New York and returned to Cape Town in 2004. He is a past- president of SAAJA and is also a training analyst. He has a special interest in dreams, complexes, archetypes and how psychoneurobiology informs our work and approach to psyche. He is also interested in exploring how the principles of analytical psychology can be applied in helping children in traumatised communities and how these principles can be applied to help us better understand politics, films, literature, and the opera.

GRACE REID:    Grace Reid is a psychologist and Jungian analyst who practices psychotherapy, psychoanalysis and supervision in Kenilworth. Her training and education took place mostly in the United States, where she was in private practice for five years before moving to Cape Town in 1990. She is currently the secretary of SAAJA’s Exco and is also a training analyst.

CPD points accredited: 1 point per evening
For 6 evenings: 6 points

Fee: R200.00 per film evening
Light supper, drinks, coffee/tea, and sweets included
Numbers are limited to 25.
Booking essential

Bookings and payments need to be made 3 days before each event for catering purposes. Your proof of payment is your entrance ticket. No Refunds.

Booking through Lynda at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

SAAJA banking details

STANDARD BANK RONDEBOSCH
CURRENT ACCOUNT ACCOUNT NAME: SAAJA
ACCOUNT NO.: 072975059
BANK CODE: 025-009

Please note: PARKING

Please park at the Baxter Theatre or along Woolsack Drive. The parking at C G Jung Centre is reserved for presenters and caterers who have equipment and goods to unload/load.

Entrance to the Centre is via the gate on Main Road or via the gate on Linray Road

Thank you for your cooperation and we look forward to welcoming you at these film evenings.

Address: C G Jung Centre, 87 Main Road, Rosebank, Cape Town 7700
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Telephone: +27 (0)21 689 6090
Office Hours: 8.30am – 1pm, Monday to Friday
Postal Address: P O Box 589, Rondebosch, 7701

 
     
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